Jim Carroll

Jim Carroll

Jim Carroll is widely recognized for his deep research and analysis of how innovative organizations are achieving market or transformational growth despite profound economic challenges. For over 15 years, Carroll has studied the issue of what makes companies relentlessly creative and how they ride critical and rapidly changing trends to achieve dramatic market success. Carroll provides guidance that is timely and unique: how to realign business strategy for fast-paced economic shifts and new business realities; a realistic outline of the emerging trends, threats and opportunities that will impact your organization; how to become a more forward thinking organization that can anticipate and manage change, rather than reacting to it; and guidance on how to do things differently in a world that demands constant, relentless innovation. The author of Ready, Set, Done: How to Innovate When Faster is the New Fast, Carroll has been featured in Business Week as one of four leading sources for insight into future trends and innovation, and was a featured expert on the CNBC Series, The Business of Innovation. Jim Carroll provides deep insights into how organizations are adapting to fast-paced trends through uniquely creative thinking and innovative leadership.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOPICS

11 Agricultural Trends

  1. Massive growth in food demand: The UK Food and Agriculture Association estimates that the world population will increase 47%, to 8.9 billion, by 2050. That’s a potentially huge food marketplace. That fact, more than anything, spells the reality that the agricultural industry is full of potential opportunity!
  2. A continuing rampup in efficiency: Simple fact: global agriculture must double in the next 30 years to sustain this type of population growth. Add this reality check: there is little new arable land in the world. The result is that existing producers will have to continue to focus on smarter, better, more efficient growing in order to meeting demand.
  3. Hyper-science: One of the realities of the infinite idea loop in which we now find ourselves is this: while there are 19 million known chemical substances today, the number is constantly doubling every 13 years… with some 80 million by 2025, and 5 billion by 2100. Science is evolving at a furious pace, and with science at the root of agriculture, we will continue to see constant, relentless new methods of improving crop and livestock yield.
  4. Innovation defines success: Growers that focus on innovation as a core value will find success; their innovation will focus on the triple-feature need for growth, efficiency and ingestion of new science. It will be by adopting new methodologies, products, partnerships and ideas that they will learn to thrive.
  5. Retail and packaging innovation drive agricultural decisions: Do this: stare at a banana. Did you know that Chiquita banana has come up with a special membrane that doubles the shelf-life of the product, doing this regulating the flow of gases through the packaging? Take a look at Naturepops: each lollipop is wrapped in fully bio-degradable film made from plant matter, and the bags they come in are made from recycled paper, water-based ink and poly lactic acid made from cornstarch. There’s a huge amount of innovation happening with packaging companies and on the store shelf, and all of these trends have a big impact on agriculture.
  6. Intelligent packaging moves front and center: Innovation with packaging will take an even bigger leap in years to come, and will involve hyperconnectivity, a trend that will be driven by food safety, tracability, country of origin and nutrition labelling needs. Our lives are soon to be transformed by packaging that can “connect” to the global data grid that surrounds us; and its’ role will have been transformed from being that of a “container of product” to an intelligent technology that will help us with use of the product, or which will help us address safety and tracability issues.
  7. The energy opportunity: Agriculture is set to play a huge role as we wean ourselves away from our dependence on oil and natural gas. The US Department of Energy plans to see alternative fuels provide 5% of the nations energy by 2020, up from 1% today. And it is expected that there will be $1.2 billion in new income for farmers and rural landowners by getting involved with new energy sources such as windpower. Europe plans to have a market that involves at least 20% usage of bio-fuels by 2020, and Feed & Grain estimates that liquid fuels from agricultural feed could replace 25% to 30% of US petroleum imports by that time.

What Do World Class Innovators Do That Others Don’t Do?

Jim Carroll has been the featured trends & innovation speaker at a wide variety of corporate leadership meetings for Fortune 1000 organizations. These meetings, often sponsored by the CEO or other senior members of management, have been focused on successful, forward oriented innovation strategies. Through his participation, has seen first hand what these organizations are doing to position themselves for post-recession opportunity. One thing they are certainly doing is finding innovative solutions to complex problems. In this motivational keynote, Jim outlines what he’s seen global innovation leaders concentrating on to ensure market success. World class innovators possess a relentless focus on growth; continually transition their revenue source; and solve customers problems – before the customer knows it’s a problem. They focus on upside down innovation by sourcing innovation ideas through their customers. They concentrate on ingesting fast ideas; check their speed and focus on corporate agility; and focus on long term wins through constant incremental improvements. They know that skills partnerships are a key success factor. And most important: world class innovators aren’t afraid to back away from big ideas: they know that right now it’s a great time to made bold decisions, and take decisive advantage to forge aggressive new paths against their competitors. While everyone else wallows in aggressive indecision and organizational sclerosis, world class innovators know that it is a great time to do great things!

How do we seize transformative opportunities?

When Do We Get to Normal?

Why Thinking BIG Will Help You Seize The Opportunities of the 21st Century

The “new normal” is that nothing will ever be normal again. Instead, transformative, deep substantive change now drives nations, markets, industries, professions and knowledge. We live in a period of time in which opportunities abound, particularly as society works to solve the big problems related to health care, the environment and energy. There are also huge opportunities related to business model disruption; the emergence of a new global infrastructure involving wireless and location intelligence technologies; the rapid emergence of new markets and products and countless other opportunities. The future belongs to those who are bold, and who are willing to think about the BIG BETS that need to be made to seize the future. In this keynote, you’ll be impassioned to think about how the real opportunities of the future will unfold.

Healthcare 2020: The Transformative Trends That Will REALLY Define Our Future.

When Jim Carroll began a recent keynote talk for the Minnesota Hospital Association CEO Summit, he announced that he wouldn’t even mention health care reform — and the audience of 300 senior executives cheered! Instead, he told the audience that he would take them on a voyage to the world of healthcare in the year of 2020, and provide them the insight they really need to deal with the challenges and opportunity of the future. Everyone in a leadership position in the US health care system knows that even with health care reform, the challenges facing the US health care system are substantial and immense. That’s why innovation has quickly come to be one of the top issues that senior healthcare executives and medical professionals are thinking about. There is a realization that there is an urgent need to challenge the very philosophies upon which the system is built. They’re seeking insight into the major scientific, technological, consumer and social trends that will, by the year 2020, allow for some very dramatic change in the concept of health care delivery. Where will we by the year 2020? We will have successfully transitioned the system from one which “fixes people after they’re sick” to one of preventative, diagnostic genomic-based medicine. Treating patients for the conditions we know they are likely to develop, and re-architechting the system around that reality. A system which will provide for virtual care through bio-connectivity, and extension of the hospital into a community-care oriented structure. A consumer driven, retail oriented health care environment for non-critical care treatment that provides significant opportunities for cost reduction. Real time analytics and location-intelligence capabilities which provide for community-wide monitoring of emerging health care challenges. “Just-in-time” knowledge concepts which will help to deal with a profession in which the volume of knowledge doubles every six years. That and much, much more. The fact is, we are going to witness more change in the world of health care in the next ten years than we have seen in the last 200. And that’s why organizations have been engaging Jim Carroll. For the last fifteen years, Jim has been providing his guidance into future trends to a wide range of global Fortune 1000 companies, associations, and other groups. In his Healthcare2020 keynote, Jim puts into perspective why innovation is no longer just a fashionable phrase — it’s the critical new leadership focus for executives in the health care sector. Jim has captivated management teams and health care professionals in keynotes for major US health groups as the St. Joseph’s Health System, Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina, Cardinal Health Care, Providence Health, Harvard Pilgrim Health Care, the Association of Organ Procurement Organizations, and the American Society for Health Care Risk Management to name but a few. He was the closing keynote speaker for the 4th annual World HealthCare Innovation and Technology Congress in Washington DC, which featured a virtual who’s who of the health care scene in the US today.

7 Things You Need to Do Right Now: Aligning The Fast Future to Your Current Strategy

While volatility rocks global markets, there continue to be fundamental truths: your industry, products, competition, skills requirements, organizational capabilities, and ability to respond to rapid change will define your future success. Innovative organizations succeed by mastering the pace of the new high velocity economy. Product innovations occur today at such a pace that “time to market” is now measured in weeks rather than years. A furious pace of technological innovation continues unabated, with the rapid emergence of new technologies that change entire industries. Customer mindset has become increasingly difficult to capture as we become a society with massive attention deficits. Business models are subject to upheaval due to economic turmoil, commercialization of product, and the rapid emergence of new competitors. It’s a fast paced world — and that’s why leading edge organizations are focused on key leadership strategies that provide for a fast paced future. In this inspirational keynote, Jim Carroll will challenge you to confront the “big trends” that you need to face head on and what you should be doing RIGHT NOW.

Brand Innovation At the Speed of Twitter: How to Innovate in the Era of Hyperconnectivity

We’re in a new fast paced world?already, 175 million people worldwide participate on social networks through mobile technology. Organizations are faced with tremendous new challenges and opportunities in building and sustaining a brand image in this era of hyper-connected consumers. And given the rate of change that is occurring as consumers increasingly begin to influence brand perception, the new reality is that it costs substantially more to maintain relevance of brand image today. The biggest challenge for brands? We find ourselves in a period of time in which a brand is no longer what you say it is; it’s what the consumer says it is! Join International futurist, trends and innovation expert Jim Carroll as he outlines the key challenges that an organization faces with the new world of social networks; the strategies that must be pursued to keep a brand fresh; and the interactive strategies and innovative methods that organizations are adopting to adapt to this new consumer reality.

Why a Recession is a Great Time for Growth and Innovation

The CEO of the American Chamber of Commerce recently caught the essence of the state of our “new normal”, when he observed that we’re in the midst of “this move from a really bad economy, to the next economy.” Jim Carroll has been offering his insight into the shape of this “next economy” to some of the largest organizations in the world, as CEOs and senior management move from “reacting to the recession” to “focusing on growth opportunities in the economy.” Jim’s insight on how to do this ranges from deep insight on how to “master fast markets;” lightening speed product innovation; innovating through new disruptive technologies; changing the rules of customer engagement and innovating with business models.

Achieving Growth!

Why Innovators Will Rule in the Post-Recession Economy – And How You Can Join Them!

Moving Beyond the Meltdown

Aligning Yourself for Growth Through Innovation How Innovators Win

The Secrets of Growth in the High Velocity Economy 7 Things You Need to Do Right Now

Aligning Yourself to the Faster Future Where’s the Growth?

What’s Hot and Not When Volatility Rocks?

Game Changers

Transformative Trends To 2020

JIM CARROLL’S BOOK

Full Biography

Full Biography

On his high school junior varsity baseball team his nickname was “Warm Up Bouton” because all he ever did was warm up, he never got into the games. The goal of becoming a major league pitcher was “unrealistic” so he did his Career Week essay on becoming a forest ranger. People are still having trouble predicting what Jim Bouton might do next.

In 1963 he won 21 games for the New York Yankees and made the all-star team. In 1964 he won 18 games and beat the Cardinals twice in the World Series.

In 1969 he wrote Ball Four, the funny, controversial, all-time bestseller that revealed baseball players as human beings. Ball Four was recently selected by the New York Public Library as one of the “Books of the Century.” The latest update, titled Ball Four: The Final Pitch, is now entertaining a new generation.

In 1970 Bouton retired from baseball and became a television sportscaster in New York where he helped WABC-TV and then WCBS-TV climb to 1st place in the ratings. During the 70’s he wrote a sequel to Ball Four entitled I’m Glad You Didn’t Take It Personally, earned good reviews in a Robert Altman movie, The Long Goodbye, and created, wrote and acted in a CBS network TV sitcom based on his book.

In 1978 Bouton made a comeback to baseball with the Atlanta Braves. Gambling his television career for a dream, Bouton rode hot buses and ate cold hamburgers for two years in the minor leagues before he was called up by the Atlanta Braves. When the 39 year old knuckleballer beat the San Francisco Giants 4-1, it was his first major league win in eight years.

During his comeback Bouton helped create Big League Chew, shredded bubble gum in a pouch, so ballplayers could look right without getting sick. Big League Chew, introduced in 1980, has replaced chewing tobacco at many high schools and colleges.

In 1996 Bouton received the highest honor of his career when he was featured in The Sports 100, “The One Hundred Most Important People in American Sports History,” published by Macmillan. This book, which covers 150 years, contains only 21 people from the world of baseball. In 1997

Bouton wrote his first novel, Strike Zone, which is now in paperback. In 1998, after 28 years, Bouton was finally invited to Old Timers’ Day at Yankee Stadium when his son Michael wrote a letter to The New York Times saying the Yankees should forgive his dad for having written Ball Four.

In 2003 Bouton self-published Foul Ball: My Life and Hard Times Trying to Save an Old Ballpark— his first diary since Ball Four. , Bouton published the book himself rather than remove certain passages ordered by his first publisher.

Bouton, who lives in Massachusetts with his wife Paula Kurman, is a frequent guest on radio and television. His hobbies are building stone walls and ballroom dancing.